Egypt: Military Coup Bodes Ill for Future Stability | Stratfor

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An Egyptian army helicopter flies over protesters calling for the ouster of President Mohamed Morsi in Cairo’s Tahrir Square on July 3. (GIANLUIGI GUERCIA/AFP/Getty Images)

Analysis

Egyptian military chief Gen. Abdel Fattah al-Sisi announced July 3 that the country’s president, Mohammed Morsi, had been removed from office in the wake of popular unrest. In a short media statement, al-Sisi, who was flanked by the three armed services chiefs, opposition leaders, the sheikh of al-Azhar Mosque and the pope of the Coptic Church, announced that Adly Mansour, chief justice of the Constitutional Court, has replaced Morsi as interim president. He also announced that the constitution has been suspended. Mansour’s appointment is notable in that one of the key demands of the Tamarod protest movement was that he become president. The provisional government will be holding fresh parliamentary and presidential elections. Continue reading

Egypt’s Atypical Military Coup | Stratfor

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Egypt's Atypical Military Coup
Egyptians salute armored personnel carriers upon their deployment on a street leading to Cairo University on July 3. (KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images)

Summary

There is a great debate underway in Egypt on whether the move to oust President Mohammed Morsi is tantamount to a military coup. Considering that the Egyptian army is forcibly removing a democratically elected president in the wake of nation-wide unrest, the military intervention is indeed a coup. However, it differs from other coups in that direct military rule will not be imposed. Continue reading